Lighting

Exposed Bulb Lighting -- what a turn on!!!! by Ginevra Held

Bedroom designed by Ginevra Held

Bedroom designed by Ginevra Held

Hey, hey, hey! Let's talk about exposed bulb lighting baby. Let's talk about you and me. Gratuitous 90's music reference. Shout out to Salt-n-Pepa.  Anywhooooo, I am a fan of exposed bulb lighting.  I used the Muuto E27 pendant lamp in both of the bedrooms I designed in my Mom's house in San Francisco.

In the photo above, they are on either side of the bed as bedside lights.  Whats great about hanging pendants on either side of  a bed is that it frees up room on the side table for books, flowers, magazines, tissues, you know the usual.  

Design wise, I love how they represent sort of the ultimate in minimalism.  Table lamps, wall sconces, chandeliers, all of these lights, at least now, require bulbs.  The bulbs are what make it a functional object, the bulb is what makes any of these lights.  Strip away the lampshades, the ornate styling and what do you have a bulb.  So a hanging bulb is the simplest purest representation of a light fixture.  And whats wonderful, is that the iconic look of a lightbulb that we all know from pictures of Edison, is beautiful in it of itself.  In fact, the Muuto E27 is named after the 27mm screw based used by Thomas Edison for the first light bulb. 

Here's another place I used it:

Design by Ginevra Held

Design by Ginevra Held

Here I put the Muuto E27 into a corner of a bedroom as a reading nook.  I paired it with Philippe Starck's Louis Ghost chair.  The ghost chair is a modern interpretation of an ornate classic.  It distills the classic form of a carved and upholstered Louis XVI armchair, makes it modern by simplifying it and making it from a modern material, clear polycarbonate.  In the background is an empty Ikea frame that takes its form from ornate Rococo frames of the 18th Century, and mass produces it in opaque white plastic.  I love the conversation these three are having.  Its like a modernist discussion of acknowledging the past and then using the present to pay homage but move forward at the same time.  This is my favorite kind of design.  A combination of past and present.  This is the ultimate in post modernism.  We have moved beyond stark minimalism (I hope) and can now contextualize and appreciate the past in the present.  I think Marie Antoinette digs it.

Here is a picture of exposed bulbs in the lobby of La Maison Champs Elysees, a hotel in Paris designed by one of my favorite designers, the famed fashion designer Martin Margiela.  I adore his use of exposed bulbs here.  Does it get any cooler than this?

La Maison Champs Elysees, désigned by Martin Margiela. photo from www.lamaisonchampselysees.com

La Maison Champs Elysees, désigned by Martin Margiela. photo from www.lamaisonchampselysees.com

Here is another photo, this one of an apartment designed by Philippe Starck for the development design company called Yoo.  Instead a single bulb, its a chandelier made from multiple bulbs, I love that look too.

Finally, I would like to mention, that exposed bulb lights emit wonderful light, Its not harsh, they work with dimmers, they look good and they function well. Isn't that the ultimate iteration of modern design, looks good and works?  I think so.